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Helping Businesses and Advertising Agencies craft messages that will resonate with the Latino Community.
  1. Carlos Gomez weighs in on how baseball has changed

    July 8, 2017 By Marly Rivera In November of 1963, after what would end up being his sixth and final season with the San Francisco Giants, Felipe Alou joined forces with journalist and biographer Arnold Hano to write an article in Sport Magazine titled "Latin-American Ballplayers Need a Bill of Rights." In the piece, Alou outlines the plight of Latin players in the early 1960s. While several of the issues mentioned, such as Alou and Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda not being allowed to sit down to eat at a restaurant due to the color of their skin, are no...
  2. Daddy Yankee Just Became the First Latin Artist to Take the #1 Slot on Spotify

    July 9, 2017 By Sigal Ratner-Arias Singer Daddy Yankee ousted Ed Sheeran from the No. 1 spot on Spotify to become the first Latino artist to lead the music platform. The Puerto Rican superstar of reggaeton has hits that include "Gasolina," ''Shaky Shaky" and "Despacito," a song co-written with Luis Fonsi. He's surpassed 44,735,586 monthly listeners to reach the first global spot, Spotify announced Sunday in an email sent to The Associated Press. "Being the first Latin artist to reach #1 in Spotify marks a precedent not only for my career but for the industry in general," Daddy Yankee, whose...
  3. Embracing a fuller Latino history for a brighter future

    July 9, 2017 By Mary Beth Faller Young Latinos need to embrace the history that has been denied to them in order to fight for their civil rights, according to a panel discussion at the National Council of La Raza conference in Phoenix on Saturday. The panel, “The Making of America: U.S. History Through the Latino Lens,” was part of the “Líderes Summit” section of the conference, for young people. The session was co-sponsored by Arizona State University; the university was also one of the overall conference sponsors. Two of the panelists, both ASU alumni, told the room full of...
  4. Salty Snacks’ Steady Influence

    July 7, 2017 By Jeffrey Steele Anyone worth their salt knows that chips and other crunchy, sodium-laden snacks are a big reason Americans love convenience stores. A quick visit to a c-store and consumers can load up on old-fashioned potato chips, newfangled veggie chips, pretzels, popcorn and other savory products that can be perfectly paired with an ice cold drink or a ready-made sandwich. Not surprisingly, the salty snacks category continues to excel. From 2011 to 2016, category sales grew 30%, reaching an estimated total of $11.2 billion, reported Mintel Group’s “Executive Summary of Salty Snacks in the U.S.,” released...
  5. In Nebraska, Hall County most closely mirrors U.S. demographics

    July 10, 2017 By Elizabeth Rembert Hall County resembles the current ethnic composition of the United States more than any other county in Nebraska, data compiled by the New York Times suggests. With a population that in 2016 was 69 percent white, 2 percent black, 27 percent Hispanic and 3 percent other, Hall County most closely reflected the U.S. in 2015, when the country had a population that was 61 percent white, 12 percent black, 18 percent Hispanic and 8 percent other. While Hall County draws parallels to the present, other counties in Nebraska echo the past and give a...
  6. Texas gerrymandering — transparent and ugly

    July 8, 2017 By Josh Brodesky What does gerrymandering really look like? We’re not talking about the imbalanced maps. The silencing of minority votes. The cracking and packing of districts to achieve and preserve political hegemony. We’re talking about the process of making those districts. What does that look like if we peel back the curtain? Emails from the creation of the 2011 Texas maps give us a glimpse — if you can stand to look. They paint an ugly picture worth keeping in mind as the latest trial in Texas’ redistricting saga kicks off this week in federal court...
  7. Alabama Program Aims To Recruit Hispanic Nurses

    July 8, 2017 Via Associate Press The University of Alabama is launching a program to increase the number of Hispanic nurses involved in health care. The Capstone College of Nursing has received a $1.7 million grant for the Bama-Latino Project, which aims to recruit Hispanics into baccalaureate nursing programs. Alabama nursing professor Normal Cuellar says in a statement that the registered nurse workforce is currently 83 percent white, and those people care for a very diverse population. She says that can cause communication and cultural problems. The Bama-Latino Project will provide scholarships to help students get into nursing programs. The...
  8. Georgia Hispanic voter turn out growing

    July 9, 2017 by Jill Nolin The state’s Hispanic voters turned out to vote at a rate higher than the national average last fall, but their showing at the polls continues to lag significantly behind other racial groups within the state. About 53 percent of Georgia’s Hispanic voters came out for the 2016 presidential election, which was up from 47 percent in 2012, according to a new report from the nonpartisan Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials. Notably, about 73 percent of registered Hispanic women cast a ballot. Nationally, nearly 48 percent of Hispanic voters participated, which was on par...
  9. Between two worlds

    July 9, 2017 By Juan Sandoval As a local person — meaning I was born in Vail — I thought I would share some of my cultural experiences growing up between two worlds. Please don't be too sensitive regarding my opinions, as I am sure many of you have formulated your own based on your upbringing, as well. Example: I am a second-generation Mexican-American, and yet, I always get asked where I'm from and when I say I was born in Vail, a look of disbelief and curiosity manifests itself in contorted facial expressions and many follow-up questions. But, I...
  10. Latino Millennials’ Home Ownership Is Key for Housing Market Growth

    July 6, 2017 By Suzanne Gamboa For Michael Alfaro, 29, who was recently married, home is a rent-controlled Los Angeles apartment while he and his wife save for a home. For Pamela Cervera, 30, and her boyfriend, it's a condo they purchased together in Washington. The two millennials may not know it, but both are on the front edge of an important anticipated boost in home ownership. How Latino millennials like Alfaro and Cervera navigate the expensive and tight housing and rental markets throughout the country is of increasing importance, because the future of home ownership in America will be...

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How come some of the people shown on the left don't look Hispanic?

Hispanic or Latino is not a race.   There are Latinos of many different races and physical characteristics.  For more information see our FAQ article, Why doesn't the census include Hispanic as a race?, and the Latino Blog post Let's Stop Segmenting People by Race! 

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