Pew Research on Hispanic Identity

Hispanic Trends
  1. More Latinos Have Serious Concerns About Their Place in America Under Trump

    About half of U.S. Latinos say the situation for Hispanics in the U.S. has worsened over the past year, and a majority say they worry that they or someone they know could be deported.

    The post More Latinos Have Serious Concerns About Their Place in America Under Trump appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  2. Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away

    High intermarriage rates and declining immigration are changing how some Americans with Hispanic ancestry see their identity. Most U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry self-identify as Hispanic, but 11%, or 5 million, do not.

    The post Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  3. Spanish language use in major U.S. metro areas

    Spanish speaking at home has declined in the top 25 metros with the largest Hispanic populations.

    The post Spanish language use in major U.S. metro areas appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  4. Latinos and the New Trump Administration

    Hispanics are divided about what a Donald Trump presidency means for their place in America, according to a Pew Research Center survey of Hispanic adults taken before his inauguration.

    The post Latinos and the New Trump Administration appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  5. The Nation’s Latino Population Is Defined by Its Youth

    Nearly six-in-ten U.S. Hispanics are Millennials or younger, making them the youngest major racial or ethnic group in the United States. In 2014, the median age of Hispanics was just 28 years.

    The post The Nation’s Latino Population Is Defined by Its Youth appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  6. 2014, Hispanics in the United States Statistical Portrait

    There were 55.3 million Hispanics in the United States in 2014, comprising 17.3% of the total U.S. population.

    The post 2014, Hispanics in the United States Statistical Portrait appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  7. Hispanic Nativity Shift

    The slowdown in growth of the Hispanic foreign-born population coincides with a decline in Mexican migration to the U.S.

    The post Hispanic Nativity Shift appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  8. 2012, Hispanics in the United States Statistical Portrait

    *Visit the most recent data. This statistical profile of the Latino population is based on Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2012 American Community Survey (ACS). Users should exercise caution when comparing the 2012 estimates with estimates for previous years. Population estimates in the 2012 ACS are based on the […]

    The post 2012, Hispanics in the United States Statistical Portrait appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  9. 2012, Foreign-Born Population in the United States Statistical Portrait

    *Visit the most recent data. This statistical profile of the foreign-born population is based on Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2012 American Community Survey (ACS). Users should exercise caution when comparing the 2012 estimates with estimates for previous years. Population estimates in the 2012 ACS are based on the […]

    The post 2012, Foreign-Born Population in the United States Statistical Portrait appeared first on Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project.

  10. Hispanic or Latino? Many don’t care, except in Texas

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Note...

How come some of the people shown on the left don't look Hispanic?

Hispanic or Latino is not a race.   There are Latinos of many different races and physical characteristics.  For more information see our FAQ article, Why doesn't the census include Hispanic as a race?, and the Latino Blog post Let's Stop Segmenting People by Race! 

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